Events

Feb 27
A Cinematic Exploration Black Community and Poverty 2:30 p.m.

Part 2: "Menace to Society"

A Cinematic Exploration Black Community and Poverty
February 27
2:30–5:30 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Part 2: "Menace to Society"

Feb 27
Pierson Lecture: "God's Red Son: The Ghost Dance Religion in American History" 3:30 p.m.

Lecture by Louis Warren, University of California, Davis. The Annual Pierson Lecture is a Department of History tradition that spans back to 1993, when it was founded to honor...
Pierson Lecture: "God's Red Son: The Ghost Dance Religion in American History"
February 27
3:30–5:00 p.m.
McKenzie Hall 375

Lecture by Louis Warren, University of California, Davis.

The Annual Pierson Lecture is a Department of History tradition that spans back to 1993, when it was founded to honor Stan and Joan Pierson. The Piersons were both exemplary citizens of the community, dedicated to history and education as proven by their distinguished records of intellectual accomplishment and community involvement. This lecture series brings distinguished scholars to the University of Oregon, so that they may share their work in alignment with the Piersons’ interests in cultural, intellectual, and political life.

Feb 27
Propaganda: Fascism and Neo-Fascism Lecture Series: "Where Monsters are Born" 4:00 p.m.

The Italian word “propaganda” originally referred to advertisements for consumer products, not political misinformation. But with the rise of the Fascism, propaganda...
Propaganda: Fascism and Neo-Fascism Lecture Series: "Where Monsters are Born"
February 27
4:00–5:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room

The Italian word “propaganda” originally referred to advertisements for consumer products, not political misinformation. But with the rise of the Fascism, propaganda assumed its modern definition: the marketing of politics. Throughout Benito Mussolini’s dictatorship (1922-1945), advertising shaped autocracy, and vice-versa. We often think of Fascist propaganda in two dimensions, picturing posters and newsreels. But because the regime created powerful incentives for private businesses to support state dictates, propaganda included architecture, fashion, and even children’s toys. Today, the far-right deploys new kinds of propaganda, using generative AI and deep fakes, to attract new followers. From Fascism to Neo-Fascism, the most powerful forms of propaganda surround voters with alternate realities. 

This speaker series brings together four scholars who have studied Italian Fascist and Neo-Fascist propaganda to understand how it creates this total environment, and how to see through it. "Where Monsters are Born," a lecture by Professor Brian Griffith documents a Fascist revival in the streets of Rome, 2018-19.

Feb 27
African American Workshop and Lecture Series: "The Robots are Coming" with Ramanita Hairston 5:00 p.m.

Cheif Executive Officer, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. Every day we find new ways to create efficiency in the workplace through the development and deployment of new technology....
African American Workshop and Lecture Series: "The Robots are Coming" with Ramanita Hairston
February 27
5:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Redwood Auditorium

Cheif Executive Officer, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

Every day we find new ways to create efficiency in the workplace through the development and deployment of new technology. Since the dawn of time, humans have sought to improve their quality of life through the use of tools and machines. For every great leap forward in progress, humans have had to adapt their own work accordingly. The workforce of today and tomorrow faces a collection of rapidly evolving opportunities and challenges as technology fuels change at an unprecedented rate. Learning has never been more important to keep pace with this change. In fact, lifelong learning has become critical. In this conversation, we'll examine how the future ready worker and the future ready leader can gain an understanding of the dynamic interplay between work, learning, and technology along with the equally dynamic interplay between workers, leaders, and organizations.

Romanita Hairston is a senior executive who works towards solutions to global challenges. She is a thought leader, change agent, and business strategist with extensive experience leading cross-sector initiatives, designing end to end solutions to meet business goals, and delivering value to customers and partners. Hairston is purposeful, data-driven, and focused on outcomes with a distinctive ability to mobilize teams to work through plans and priorities at the executive level to improve effectiveness. She has worked at the national and global level in the corporate, philanthropic, and nonprofit sector on issues ranging from global skilling and educational equity to child well-being and employability. Her experience ranges from grassroots community leadership development to management of global initiatives, projects and programs.

As Chief Executive Officer, Romanita oversees all program activities of the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. An accomplished team builder, convener, and leader, Romanita draws on more than two decades of experience in the nonprofit (World Vision), for profit (Microsoft), and philanthropic (Murdock Trust) sectors, alongside a consistent commitment to board service (Global Women, India Partners, Urban Alliance, Urban Impact, Kids in Need, and Impact Latin America) born out of a desire to engage in her highest and best use. A graduate of the University of Washington, Romanita earned her MBA from Eastern University (Philadelphia).

RSVP https://oregon.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9uIgN4N5oKOUxrE

Feb 28
Black Joy Sessions: Finding Joy Within 1:00 p.m.

Black students, faculty members, and staff are invited to engage in activities that center Black joy including art, laughter, music, and movement. Black Joy Sessions create a...
Black Joy Sessions: Finding Joy Within
January 31–March 13
1:00–2:00 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Black students, faculty members, and staff are invited to engage in activities that center Black joy including art, laughter, music, and movement. Black Joy Sessions create a space to center a celebration of Black culture, uplift, heal, and empower using a liberated narrative of the Black experience. This space is designed to be an easy, transformative, and love-infused space to create, express, and (re)claim Black joy.

Feb 28
Let's Talk Drop-In - Wednesdays 2-4PM @ BCC 2:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, at the Black Cultural Center. Let’s Talk is a service...
Let's Talk Drop-In - Wednesdays 2-4PM @ BCC
January 17–March 20
2:00–4:00 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Meet with Counseling Services Cecile Gadson, who specializes in working with Black and African American students, at the Black Cultural Center.

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a CS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our CS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s Talk work?

Let’s Talk will be offered via Zoom and/or in satellite locations across campus. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 29
Book Launch & Discussion - "Coloring into Existence: Queer of Color Worldmaking in Children’s Literature" noon

Isabel Millán is Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. She is the author of the recently published book, Coloring...
Book Launch & Discussion - "Coloring into Existence: Queer of Color Worldmaking in Children’s Literature"
February 29
noon
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Gunwood Room 245

Isabel Millán is Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. She is the author of the recently published book, Coloring into Existence: Queer of Color Worldmaking in Children’s Literature, which recovers a genealogy of queer and trans of color picture books across North America.

Featuring special guests: 

Sonia Alejandra Rodríguez, Professor of English (CUNY)

Maude Hines, Professor of English & Black Studies (PSU)

Ernesto Martinez, Associate Professor of IRES (UO)

Feb 29
¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group 1:30 p.m.

¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group is a drop-in processing and support space for Latinx students to share information and develop skills to tackle challenging situations such as...
¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group
February 1–March 21
1:30–3:00 p.m.
Carson Hall, Ramey Room

¡Juntos! Latinx Support Group is a drop-in processing and support space for Latinx students to share information and develop skills to tackle challenging situations such as academic stress, family challenges, self-worth, relationships, mental health concerns, and much more. Group members will be able to work through their presenting concerns, find community, and be empowered in a protected therapy space.

Feb 29
Organic/Inorganic/Materials Chemistry Seminar Series 3:00 p.m.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Organic/Inorganic/Materials Seminar Series   Professor Niya Sa, University of Massachusetts   Probe the Dynamic Interfaces...
Organic/Inorganic/Materials Chemistry Seminar Series
February 29
3:00 p.m.
McKenzie Hall 125

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Organic/Inorganic/Materials Seminar Series   Professor Niya Sa, University of Massachusetts   Probe the Dynamic Interfaces of Beyond Lithium-ion Energy Storage Systems 

Rapid growth of technology in the past few decades has spurred a demand for advanced energy storage devices. The invention of a more advanced battery system with higher levels of performance will be a groundbreaking discovery in the rechargeable battery field. Multivalent chemistry offers promising benefits in the development of beyond lithium-ion technologies. The direct usage of the multivalent metal anode is essential to enhance the energy density of the multivalent ion battery. For instance, Magnesium, Calcium and Zinc offer an immense alternative to the existing Li-ion batteries due to their multivalent nature and vast abundance in the Earth’s crust. However, possible film formation at the solid/liquid interface complicates the electrochemical properties of such systems. The least understood solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), its formation and dynamic evolution has not been extensively explored for multivalent battery systems with many unknowns remain to be answered. We aim to use electroanalytical tools to probe the dynamic evolution of the solid electrolyte interface in-situ for multivalent systems and investigate its correlation with the electrochemical processes. This presentation focuses on some very recent research findings from our team for understanding the interfacial chemistry, evolution, and stability for different multivalent battery systems.   

 

Mar 1
Let's Talk Drop-In - Fridays 1-3PM @ CMAE/Zoom 1:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Gonzalo Camp, who specializes in working with LatinX and undocumented students, at the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (Oregon Hall-Room...
Let's Talk Drop-In - Fridays 1-3PM @ CMAE/Zoom
January 19–March 22
1:00–3:00 p.m.

Meet with Counseling Services Gonzalo Camp, who specializes in working with LatinX and undocumented students, at the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence (Oregon Hall-Room 130) or click here: https://zoom.us/j/92243720320

Let’s Talk is a service that provides easy access to free, informal, and confidential one-on-one consultation with a Counseling Services staff member. See our website for six additional Let’s Talk days/times offered throughout the week.

Let’s Talk is especially helpful for students who:

Have a specific concern and would like to consult with someone about it. Would like on-the-spot consultation rather than ongoing counseling. Would like to consult with a CS staff member about what actual therapy looks like. Would like to meet with one of our CS identity-based specialists. Have a concern about a friend or family member and would like some ideas about what to do.

How does Let’s Talk work?

Let’s Talk will be offered via Zoom and/or in satellite locations across campus. As a drop-in service, there is no need to schedule an appointment and no paperwork to be completed. Students are seen individually on a first-come, first-served basis at the times listed below. There may be a wait in the Zoom waiting room if the Let’s Talk staff member is meeting with another student. Please wait and we will be with you as soon as we can. Let’s Talk appointments are brief (usually between 15-30 minutes) and are meant to be used on an as-needed basis. 

Click here for Let's Talk - Fridays 1-3PM or see Gonzalo at the CMAE, Room 130: https://zoom.us/j/92243720320